fablefire:

eqad-mod:

ladybowtheboo:

asobita-i:

Reblog for the last one

it’s a game show where everyone eats the furniture in a room and tries to see which is made of chocolate

That last one.

Last one.

(Source: iraffiruse)

instagram:

Capturing the 2014 Holi Festivals on Instagram

To view more photos and videos from Holi festivals, browse the #holi and #holi2014 hashtags on Instagram.

On Monday, Hindus everywhere celebrate Holi, an annual festival of colors that marks the beginning of spring. The festivities start out with bonfires held on the eve of Holi, which symbolize the victory of good over evil in Hindu mythology.

On the day of Holi, thousands of people take to the streets to celebrate the abundant colors of spring by throwing colored powder and water at one another in mass gatherings. In Hindu temples, devotees enter into a shower of colors as they gather for holiday prayers. The festivities are traditionally held by Hindu communities in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Nepal, and nowadays are spreading across non-Hindu communities as an opportunity to engage with the Hindu culture. Drawn by the vibrant colors, many Instagrammers taking part in the celebration are capturing and sharing this joyous and colorful day with the world.

Il Settimo sigillo (Ingmar Bergman, 1957)

(Source: danieldaylewiswithamoustache)

Office - Dream 26012014

Part 1

The blue lighting gives a coldness to the metal desks that infinitely fill the large office space. Desks upon desks hold computers with old grayish screens. Keyboards rest on the tables after weeks upon weeks of labor leave them with black marks on the previously white keys. The pictures one would normally place on the desk are all but empty frames and not a single ounce of humanity can be found in this endless moonlight.

There, behind the shades and a glass door, lies, under the scope of my rifle, the VP of this company. I see him working. The balding spot on his head with a cross on it. I load my rifle. Hold my breath. Unaware of the bullet that will shortly create a hole between his eyebrows Mr. VP continues to dabble on his computer. Numbers upon numbers, Income on top of income, all of it flowing through him. The lives of a thousand plus families being managed through his incapable fingers. It is at these times that I think about the meaning of life, and as I press the soft trigger and feel the warm kick of the rifle against my shoulder, I feel one with the universe.

Glass is shattered as the copper death flies through the air. A low ringing fills my ears as blood spits to his computer monitor. The hands twitching as the keyboard overflows with blood. The dirty keys become red. Pinkish remains spread on the floor and his head continues to bob back and forth, struck by the forceful impact of a seven millimeter bee. 

fishingboatproceeds:

650,000 notes???I really am best known on tumblr for a drizzle/hurricane metaphor. (This is from my book Looking for Alaska.)

fishingboatproceeds:

650,000 notes???

I really am best known on tumblr for a drizzle/hurricane metaphor.

(This is from my book Looking for Alaska.)

Ukraine in the past few days. Remaining photos at http://zyalt.livejournal.com/982589.html

Ukraine in the past few days. Remaining photos at http://zyalt.livejournal.com/982589.html

newsweek:

In 16th- and 17th-century London, in response to recurrent epidemics of bubonic plague, authorities instituted the tradition of publishing a bill of mortality each week. 

The “Great Plague of London,” which hit the city in the summer of 1665, is estimated to have killed between 75,000 and 100,000 Londoners (out of a total population of about 460,000). This page represents the death tally of all city parishes for the week of Aug. 15-22, 1665, when the plague had infected 96 of the 130 parishes reporting. 

In his book Shakespeare’s Restless World: A Portrait of an Era in Twenty Objects, Neil MacGregor writes that the bills cost about a penny, and were published in large print runs. The other side of the bills contained information on deaths broken down parish by parish. (via Bill of mortality: Document shows death toll during the Great Plague of London)

newsweek:

In 16th- and 17th-century London, in response to recurrent epidemics of bubonic plague, authorities instituted the tradition of publishing a bill of mortality each week.

The “Great Plague of London,” which hit the city in the summer of 1665, is estimated to have killed between 75,000 and 100,000 Londoners (out of a total population of about 460,000). This page represents the death tally of all city parishes for the week of Aug. 15-22, 1665, when the plague had infected 96 of the 130 parishes reporting.

In his book Shakespeare’s Restless World: A Portrait of an Era in Twenty Objects, Neil MacGregor writes that the bills cost about a penny, and were published in large print runs. The other side of the bills contained information on deaths broken down parish by parish. (via Bill of mortality: Document shows death toll during the Great Plague of London)

For Sale: Baby shoes, never worn.
Student blood

Student blood

It’s about misunderstandings between people and places, being disconnected and looking for moments of connection. There are so many moments in life when people don’t say what they mean, when they are just missing each other, waiting to run into each other in a hallway.
wired:

newyorker:

The Daily Cartoon by Paul Noth: http://nyr.kr/1hVmbCN

On. Point.

wired:

newyorker:

The Daily Cartoon by Paul Noth: http://nyr.kr/1hVmbCN

On. Point.

(Source: newyorker.com)

dexbonus:

izacless:

The Bearded Mermaid

Princess of Agrabeard

Beauty and her Beard

[Inspiration] [Credit]

idgaf if dwarves have taught me anything it’s that lady beards are A++++

"it is said of the ouroboros that he slays himself and brings himself to life, fertilizes himself and gives birth to himself. He symbolizes the One, who proceeds from the clash of opposites,"

"it is said of the ouroboros that he slays himself and brings himself to life, fertilizes himself and gives birth to himself. He symbolizes the One, who proceeds from the clash of opposites,"